Incentive // Incentive

Incentive's second self-titled album is also available digitally from circle with a dot, here: incentive.bandcamp.com/album/incentive-2021 Credits released September 17, 2021 Incentive - production, vocals, synthesizer, mixing Chase Jackson - master engineer Nice Flaws & Incentive - album art

Review of Alan Morse Davies – Hymns

Enlightened review from Yeah I know It Sucks

Yeah I Know It Sucks

Artist: Alan Morse Davies
Title: Hymns
Keywords: experimental ambient art progressive United Kingdom
Label: Submarine Broadcasting Company

I couldn’t sleep and pretty much bored of counting sheep. Luckily Alan Morse Davies popped up at the right moment with a solution: counting goats. As I counted the goats Alan Morse Davies brought a whole bunch of public domain records to compliment the dream world that I had finally reached. The goats had paraded by and jumped over a random fence quite successfully and now I was in a deep sleep enjoying the music selection of the past as presented, mixed and breath new life into it by Alan Morse Davies.

In my dream he stood behind a deejay desk, but instead of mixing and matching the usual beat orientated stompers into each other, he would spin the historic round sound of forgotten history, glueing them gradually like a collage of ghosts…

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GOATS ‘Far Out’ Review from Monolith Cocktail

Monolith Cocktail Blog

Reviews Column: Dominic Valvona


Back after a short hiatus, my eclectic spread of recommendations and reviews features, as ever, a bumper edition of recent releases. There’s a suitably seasonal solo album from a Beach Boys imbued Mike Gale that wallows in the scorching rays, called Summer Deluxe; some live action from the Ottoman/Edwardian imbued period fusion of Arab and English music hall Brickwork Lizards, who’s new EP features a quartet of live recorded tracks from the St. Giles sessions; there’s a trippy psych peregrination hard sell from the Submarine Broadcasting Company in the form of a GOATS (not that one, this is another group entirely) cassette tape called Far Out; the latest beautifully, if despondently, articulated songbook from Oliver Cherer, I FeelNothing Most Days; the musical suite in all its glory from Bethany Stenning’s multimedia conceptual art film The Human Project, released via…

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Review of Cousin Silas and Pendro ‘The Audio Scullery’

Submariner-in-Chief Rob reviews the recent work from Cousin Silas and Pendro: The Audio Scullery is the latest collaboration between Cousin Silas and Pendro - an interesting joint venture on several fronts, not least perhaps the perceived difference in styles: Cousin Silas, a musician I tend to think of as melodic and accessible, and Pendro, who …

Review of Stringmodulator’s ‘Manifesto’ from Monolith Cocktail Blog

Dominic Valvona’s New Music Reviews Roundup A bumper roundup this month from me of eclectic tastes from across the sphere, including albums, singles, cassettes and EPs from Kammerflimmer Kollektief, Andrew Heath, Picturebox, Bokanté And Metropole Orkest, Acid Mothers Temple & The Melting Paraiso U.F.O., Perhaps and Stringmodulator. In brief, ‘lower-case’ minimalist composer Andrew Heath delivers […] …

MANIPULANT – Single Review: “What Good Are the Stars?”

Brilliant review of the new Manipulant single from Eclectic Music Lover:

ECLECTIC MUSIC LOVER

Manipulant WGATS art

Lancaster, Pennsylvania-based artist Manipulant (aka David Speakman) is an imaginative and intensely creative multi-instrumentalist/composer of electronic music that he refers to as “scientific sound spaces.” In 2016, he released his debut album Méthode de Narration, and followed up a year later with the superb Eclectro, which I reviewed and you can read here.  On July 4th, he dropped his latest work, an EP of sorts with the single “What Good Are the Stars?” as the main track, plus three remixes.

“What Good Are the Stars?” is mysterious and sublime, with a glittery soundscape of swirling synths that seem to float above the subtle bassline. A gentle hypnotic drumbeat  keeps the languid pace, and a delicate but haunting repeating piano riff adds a sense of unease to the mesmerizing track. Manipulant’s smooth, echoed vocals have an otherworldly feel as he sings the lyrics that question his inability to…

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Review: Pendro/Figmentland

Pendro is the name of Tim Jones' experimental music and sound design project. He released his latest album, 'Figmentland', in March. It's unapologetically experimental, but that's no left-handed compliment; it's a fiercely creative album, full of textures, cinematic sound-staging, and even emotion. It's also an album that rewards repeated listens as familiarity with the basic …