compilation

August Releases: Cottura 8 Minuti and Manipulant

Two releases this month, both somewhat unusual.

First up is the various artists compilation, Cottura 8 Minuti (or C8M). This is compilation of music made in, or at least centered around, the kitchen. We’d love to take credit for C8M, but the truth is the curation and heavy-lifting was done by Lezet and Razrook, both of whom appear on the compilation.

Lezet (Igor Jovanovic) says:

“Cottura 8 minuti – that’s a suggested time for preparing a meal (often printed on pasta package, spaghetti for instance).

Cottura 8 minuti (C8M) was also a suggestion for musicians and sound artists to contribute in gathering a collection of sound recordings that all originate from any sort of a kitchen (indoor, outdoor, home, restaurant etc.)

C8M – gave freedom to explore all kinds of kitchenish soundscapes. The performances (“cooking” the sounds, or other recording engagement in the kitchen, using kitchenware to produce sound, music, or even playing real instruments while cooking them in a stew…) don’t all last for 8 minutes, but we gave the artists strict instructions not to overcook it!”

As you might expect, C8M is predominantly experimental, containing generous servings of field recordings, noise, no-wave and treated sounds. Artists featured include Zumaia, Mean Flow, { AN } Eel , Gekkering, Awkward Geisha, Yann Pillas, David Nadeau, David Fenech and many more.

C8M is available as a digital download from Bandcamp, iTunes and Amazon, or on two CDs from Bandcamp.

All proceeds from C8M go to the Petar Radovanović Children’s Home, Užice, Serbia.

 


Our other release so far in August is a first for SBC, an album of remixes. We’ve taken Manipulant’s lovely single ‘What Good Are The Stars?’ and handed it out to a phalanx of musical luminaries and encouraged them to do unspeakable things with it.

Punningly entitled ‘The Stars Are Good… What?’, the album includes remixes from SBC ‘regulars’ Martin Neuhold, Alan Morse Davies, t.r. hand and Beltism, plus a plethora of guest artists new to the label:  A Multitude of ONE, Cheddr, Stoneygate, Alex Hilliard with IE Unnoticed, Incentive, and Once & Future NoOne. It’s a fantastically inventive collection of remixes, ranging from the sympathetic through to complete re-workings.

‘The Stars Are Good… What?’ is available as a digital download or CD from Bandcamp. All proceeds go to the Make The World Better (MTWB) Foundation (Philadelphia). www.mtwb.org

News from the Conning Tower: Exhibition

So much news, so few typing fingers! OK, Exhibition. Exhibition is the name of our 2018 ‘open’ compilation. There are three strands to the compilation, Red, Green and Blue: Red is the most experimental and challenging, Green is predominantly instrumental or ambient, and Blue is rock, post-rock, pop, electronica and so on.

We’re accepting entries until the end of March, but at the time of writing we’ve had submissions from:

Manga Brothers
Cousin Silas
Merge
Alan Morse Davis
CJA Band
Spartan Jet-Plex
Carbonates on Mars
Autonomaton
precocious mouse
Zumaia
Ruido
Nurse Predator
Ian Haygreen
Rauppwar
Lucidbeaming
Earthborn Visions
Pisse Larve
Peri Esvultras
Noise Cluster
God Cancer
James Hoehl
Raas
3SBAT
Feasibility Study
Cosmic Colonel
Manipulant
Crayon Angels
ikjoyce
Almark
Lezet
Intersonic Subformation
Ryliss
Icy Rainbows
{AN} EeL/Christopher Petkus/Lorne Shapiro
t.r. hand
Hans Castrup
Mean Flow
Against Nature
The Moth Poets
The Blank Holidays
Shice Squad
Tim Kays
Somta
Bridget Wishart & The Band of Doctors
Arka Sengupta
BlindººCoyote
Hypercube & Mario Lino Stancati
Janusz Brudniewicz

It’s going to be huge! You can read the original blurb about Exhibition here.

News from the Conning Tower: “No Port Of Call: Songs From The Flying Dutchman”

This promises to be a great compilation from my friends at Argali Records…

Argali Records

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[TEMPORARY ARTWORK, FINAL ARTWORK SUBJECT TO CHANGE]

Experimental music/noise compilation, focusing on the themes of ghost ships, including The Flying Dutchman, and others, including more contemporary examples, such as the dimension-shifting USS Eldridge. Current submission window is from now until the end of March, with a tentative release in mid April.
Thanks again! 🙂

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES;

I. Tracks submitted need to be exclusive to this compilation.
NO remixes or tracks released previously on other compilations.
II. Audio files need to conform to Bandcamp uploading standards. WAV/FLAC only.
III. ONE submission per band/musician please.
IV. Tracks should ideally be between one to ten minutes in length (if it’s a little bit longer than that, that should be OK too).
V. Please include your project name and website/Bandcamp with your submission email.
VI. Be sure music file is titled in “Band name – track name” format.
VII. Please use WeTransfer or similar…

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Of krautrock and Klang

So, krautrock.

I suspect most of us have a mental image of what krautrock should sound like, but it’s odd because as Stuart Maconie succinctly pointed out “in truth, no two Krautrock acts sound remotely alike“. The very term krautrock itself sticks in my craw, but for whatever reason, the alternative – less offensive – names like kosmische musik just haven’t really gained the same widespread acceptance. Some people argue that the term has transcended its racist origins; I’m not convinced, but for the sake of ease of common understanding, we’ll stick with ‘krautrock’ for now.

I expect my journey into krautrock was not unusual; I listened to Kraftwerk as a young teen, graduating to Faust and Tangerine Dream when I should have just been graduating. Then as an adult with an ever-expanding musical taste, an inquisitive disposition and a little more disposable income I found bands like Neu! and Can, and started to understand how significant they have been in the development of rock music. Then you get into the hard stuff – Amon Düül II, Cluster, Popol Vuh, Harmonia and so on. Before long you start meeting people in car parks who might be able to source a rare La Düsseldorf demo.

The Submarine Broadcasting Company is just over a year old now, and we’re immensely proud of the releases we’ve achieved in our first year. But now we want to broaden our horizons and turn our attention to the krautrock that we’re so passionate about. So with that in mind we set out to find today’s krautrock-influenced bands and present a showcase of their music. This is our new project. This is Klang.

We’ve got eight great bands and the tracks demonstrate a heady mix of motorik, kosmische and elektronische influences, along with a healthy dose of psych and garage rock. Our line-up includes the legendary Six By Seven, from Italy we have Unimother 27, from Finland the Oulu Space Jam Collective, Peri Esvultras from Belgium, Shice Squad from Germany, from the UK we have Dynamo Snackbar and Beltism, and from no fixed address we have t.r. hand. We have some rare tracks, some exclusive mixes and some  tracks exclusive to Klang.

So far, so good. But if you are going to make a krautrock compilation, we felt it really needs to be on vinyl. We all know nothing compares with the look, the feel – even the smell – of a great vinyl LP. And we want to do it properly – heavyweight vinyl, gatefold sleeve, optimum length for best sound quality, the whole nine yards.

The initial costs for a vinyl project are huge compared to our previous CD projects, so we’re going to be asking for your help to raise the money to press what is going to be a very special album. Towards the end of February, maybe start of March, we’ll be running a Kickstarter campaign to help us meet the manufacturing costs.

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Artist’s impression. Not to scale. Contents may vary from packaging. Serving suggestion only.

I really hope you’ll support us in this venture. It’s a big deal for us, in every respect. So even if krautrock isn’t your first choice of listening pleasure, or vinyl isn’t your prefered medium, I hope you’ll think about putting a couple of quid in to get us across the line. Keep an eye open for the Kickstarter, although I expect we might just mention it again.

Rob x

News from the conning tower: British Library

I have been approached by the British Library to lodge copies of Post:Soc and One String Inspiration with them for posterity.

Speaking entirely personally, while this is not strictly a badge of merit like being inducted into the Rock’n’roll Hall of Fame or anything, I am quite proud that something a group of worldwide independent musicians and and I have jointly made will be preserved for future generations to puzzle over, and it’s nice to think of One String Inspiration nestling comfortably between Never Mind the Bollocks and Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.

I’ll try to post an update when the recordings have been accessioned (that’s the term, apparently) and we can all converge on the British Library and demand to hear them.

Rob

Monolith Cocktail review: Post:Soc

Monolith Cocktail’s detailed review of Post:Soc. Definitely +1hp for use of “moiety”.

Monolith Cocktail Blog

NEW MUSIC REVIEW ROUNDUP

WORDS: DOMINIC VALVONA


A somewhat shorter selection but just as much quality and eclecticism, my final roundup of the year includes the cinematic pop and harrowing void explorations of Alpine Those Myriads; the latest compilations from Edinburgh label of alternative and post rock mavericks and sonic explorers, Bearsuit RecordsThe Invisible & Divided Sea, and the altruistic, charity driven Submarine Broadcasting Company’s latest sprawling collection, Post:Soc; the fourth edition of Knitting Factory’s curated Fela Kuti box sets, with albums chosen by that rebel soul songstress and polymath Erykah Badu; and for the first time ever the entire – admittedly small – 1970s recorded oeuvre of one of Cameroon’s leading Gandjal rhythm providers, Hamad Kalkaba and his Golden Sounds band.

Alpine Those Myriads   ‘Visions & Disorders’
See Hear Feel Smell,  out now.

Set adrift out into the void, though…

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News from the conning tower

Crikey O’Riley. There’s a lot going on. So, in no particular order, the Exhibition compilations: you know about those, yeah? Well, they’re ticking over nicely, we’ve already had some really strong tracks submitted and some very encouraging expressions of interest from several artists. Closing date is end of March, but you knew that.

We are also putting together a Krautrock/Kosmische/Motorik inspired compilation; sworn to secrecy around some of the participants, but very pleased to say we have Dynamo Snackbar, Shice Squad, Unimother 27 and Peri Esvultras on board. And Beltism, of course. Always with the Beltism.

Thirdly, a lot of work has been going on for the new Submarine Broadcasting Co. signing, whose new EP we hope to release in February. A few i’s to dot and t’s to cross, but it’s all looking very promising. We’ll share more as soon as we can.

Finally, two very special compilations, not on SBC but thoroughly deserving of your ears and money. Firstly, Studio 4632’s benefit compilation for the wonderful Modul 303 webradio station:

And secondly Argali Records’ sublime experimental compilation Dream Topography:

Forthcoming attractions…

Well, delighted to hear that the final track for Post:Soc Post:Script (you know, the third disc of the double album) is nearing completion. This is good news on several fronts: firstly it means the pre-orders can be fulfilled, and that the Post:Soc publicity machine can roll into action and hopefully we’ll raise some money for DePaul International. But also it means that the forthcoming Submarine Broadcasting projects can be announced… yes, projects plural. Musicians and sound designers, watch this space as you won’t want to miss this!

Also, we seem to be very near to signing a new artist to the label, which is terrifically exciting! Not going to say too much as it’s early days and there is some detail to thrash out yet, but fingers and toes are crossed.